Recalling the Mother Tongue Theatre Movement

When all of us talking about “Going Local”, here we would like to recall some of such movements happened in the past, to get inspired by those true spirit.

One such movement is Mothertongue Theatre Movement 2005, which clearly said, all regional languages theatre (means “Local” theatre) has to be considered as “National Theatre”, decentralize the National cultural Institutes and more, which we must work towards.

Are we really “Going Local”?

In the name of Local, centralized, uniform, authoritarian culture is not enforced on us?, Hope, the below movement brochure gives you more clarity of thought.

Note: Brochure courtesy Kavi Kavya Trust & Shramajeevi Ashrama, Bhimanakone, Sagara, Karnataka Library

  • Gram Seva Sangh
Veteran Theatre Personalities M S Sathyu, Chindodi Leela, Nagabharana and Prasanna can be seen in this cover page photo of the movement brochure

Are we really “going local”?

In the not-so-recent past

During the sunset-years of the 19th century, a radical thought was taking shape in India. The “Swadeshi Movement” which was officially launched in 1905 had its theoretical aspects defined in the late 1800s. Stalwarts such as Naoroji, Tilak, Ghokale, Aurobindo are credited with the thought leadership for the same. History tells us that the Swadeshi movement is a “nationalistic movement”, i.e a political movement. But at its very core, this movement was an economical one, born from the understanding that the oppression of the Indians within India was predicated upon the economic control of the entire Indian populace by a few Englishmen.

Being “nationalistic”, today is not considered good behavior by many; it certainly is not seen as progressive. We now associate it with mostly the right-wing, jingoistic and populist style of politics that has taken roots in most parts of the world that has sailed the democratic and secular oceans to arrive at this point. What happened? One reason could be the mix-up involving “method” and “intent”. Movements like the Swadeshi were born out of the need for human beings to unshackle themselves from an oppressor, “a real adversary” (so to speak). Today’s nationalism is born out of the need to manufacture non-existent enemies or distract us from the real ones or both.

The modus-operandi of the Swadeshi Movemement was to “go local”; to boycott foreign products (very specifically, British) and opt for local produce. Underlying this was the confidence that came from “Atmashakthi” (self-strength) , a term coined by Rabindranath Tagore during the same years, when he was putting together his thoughts on Indian Nationalism. In other words, to even begin thinking about boycotting something, to say a “firm no” to external help or input, one first needed to build the inner strength to be self reliant and be confident enough to endure what comes after.

The Swadeshi movement later paved way to progressively mature and effective movements. With the entry of Gandhiji into the Indian Independence Struggle, “Swadeshi” found new intent, meaning and methods where he combined his success of the Satyagraha (that he conceived while in South Africa) with the good-parts of the Swadeshi movement to come up with the tools and ethos which made possible a national conscience strong enough to put up a non-violent struggle against the British-might.

Our grand experiments with “local”

Colonialism, and India’s tryst with it aside, the need for “going local” has been the need-of-the-hour for long. Every individual who has considered or worked towards an “ecologically viable”, “socially just” and “economically alternative” society knows the importance of “going local”. In fact to understand the benefits of going local, one only has to stare at the disadvantages of a world that went global; to be specific, the disadvantages of “globalization”.

Chipko Movement | Photo Courtesy -www.rightlivelihoodaward.org

It has been a perpetual struggle between these two forces. One that wanted to establish a global-order and another that resists it by celebrating diversity, “the local” and decentralization. If there is a tiny amount of hope today with some skill and culture left in parts of the world that are not yet completely transformed, it is because of the small victories of the latter group. In India especially, even today, we retain some traditional agricultural methods, weaving practices, skills and products that demand respect for human labour simply because we upheld the notion of local over global; a storyline of struggle that connects movement to movement, generation to generation. But was that enough?

We have deluded ourselves in some cases of “going local”; in most cases, we have celebrated too early. This is because we overestimated our success. The very fact that, as a society, we democratically elected a corporation-friendly, yet traditional-sounding ideological concoction, as our leaders and governments today, should be proof enough that we have completely missed our goals. Our attempts all these years to stay local has been within the perimeters set by the “market”; issue of having to “comply”. We have had so many of our “local” stories that gladly claim to be “Swadeshi” but actually can only be considered local “productions” at best. Even the not-so-nuanced original “Swadeshi Movement” was about “local consumption”. Gandhi’s and Kumarappa’s interpretation and experiments with Swadeshi have been about both consumption and production.

These are strong reasons today to rise above our own petty self-declared victories and march towards what is truly local. If nothing, the collapse our years of “half-baked” local movements in current times when a pandemic has struck the world, should serve us as a reminder that our job is far from complete.

“Local” politics

It was only a matter of time before the hyper-nationalistic party, that forms the Indian Government today, decided to use “local” in their vocabulary. It is also very amusing that Tagore’s “Atmashakthi” has been aptly re-purposed into an “Atma Nirbharata” (presumably meaning the same thing but with a twist for the slogan-entertained citizen of the present).

The call to go local is not new even within the short history of the current ruling party. “Make in India” was a campaign that ran before this and regardless of what the “thinkers” thought about it, the average person’s idea of this matter varied from “International companies employing Indian workers” to “Made in a factory that is physically located on Indian soil”; a vague enough cloud of interpretative smoke behind which we can continue to worship the only God we know now; that of Capital.

During the Coronavirus crisis of 2020, the call to “go local” will again have all sorts of interpretations. For some – with an overconfident zeal- it has become a chance to raise some dirt against our behemoth neighbour, China. For others, this is an opportunity to “somehow stay alive and relevant” in the dark-and-dying days of Capitalism. So going local today will only mean one thing for businesses that never came up with the true intent of creating local economies; to extract “whatever is left” in terms of resources and run away with the last few crumbs of the pie.

“Local” is but one word in a dictionary and this word is loaded. Hence it is easy to be used to abused, which it will be. So was “Swadeshi” and so was “Swaraj”. We need to look at all the words involved and truly take them in. Self, friends, family, village, community, nativity, interdependence, social, sacrifice, commons, sustainability, ethics, rootedness, belonging etc. Understanding those terms, seeking out and making changes, starting with the self, is essential for understanding what is meant by “local”. But that is not what the politicians will tell us. We need to be wary.

Striving to be “local

For us to even consider having made a dent by “being local”, we would have to first look at “local consumption”. This is not the same as a city-based-consumer buying a product that has the label “locally produced” (be it food, durable or clothes). It is about actual fuel-miles that the product took to reach the consumer, beginning from raw-material extraction that formed its component parts. Taking an example of unstitched cloth, “How far is the weaver from you?”, “Where is the lady who spun the yarn?” “Where was the cotton grown?” are what defines the product to be classified as local. This works for all products and services. “How far is your kid’s school teacher?”. “Where are my cups and saucers made?”. “Did I make that compost I used for my organic herb-garden, or did I buy it from Thailand from a local community?”.

So when the health conscious consumer in Mumbai buys organically grown fresh vegetables from rural Maharashtra, or the ethnicity and ethics conscious consumer in Bangalore buys hand-crafted products from rural Karnataka, we are barely scratching the surface. This is true when we also find false equivalences between organic and local, ethical and local, environmental-friendly and local, handloom and local etc. Which usually leads to newer forms of markets but never truly addresses the real problem, that of consumerism.

Citizens Burning Boycotting Chinese Products as a reaction, after twenty Indian army personnel were martyred during a clash with Chinese troops in Ladakh’s Galwan valley | Photo Courtesy – PTI

The other larger issue when striving to be local is about mixing up the urge and well-meaning intent to be local with nationalism and regionalism, with complete disregard to areas, sizes, climactic conditions and watersheds that form the basis for defining real “locals”. If we were to exist in the southern-most tip of India and home-order something from Assam, can it be deemed local? In large states (that are the size of some of the world’s countries), does it even make sense to create the food miles necessary to transport goods from one corner to the other? Thinking “local” should be elevated above petty administrative boundaries.

Folk Singing Community from Hyderabad Karnataka

Limiting “local” into “products” is also an issue. There is a lot more to local than that; languages, knowledge, customs, know-how and ways-of-life. We need to be able to re-adapt some and value them for what they are. We should avoid being led into a guilt-trip (a trick often played on us by our own modernity) that all local is automatically barbaric, bad and evil. In fact an objective mind should look at “local” for its spatial, economic and environmental value alone. The evolution of “local” from some ancient-form into a newer-form is not “global” (an easy mistake to make), it is just newer-local, a current-and-improved form, as we individuals and communities learn and move on. Hence understanding local and appreciating it for “concepts” before “products” will actually go a long way in understanding production and consumption itself.

It is very tempting to give ourselves the “local” label very quickly, either because our existing delusions need validation or we are part of the same group that needs to pathologically align with the political conscience of this country. Both are not going to help in the long run. To be local, we need to look at the full circle and begin at consumption and then go towards production. This also means, we have to produce for necessity and not for the sake of production itself (which is one of the pillars holding up Capitalism and all of the monsters it spawned, including the current Coronavirus crisis).

The word “local” itself is not lying to us; the people who use it are. It only has a “space implication”, i.e of distance between us (the consumer) and the site of production. Our ideas and thoughts need to have far-reaching implications and consequences but our resource extraction and consumption should now have short-distance gratification and value. To be “truly local” we need to aim for a diverse and colourful world composed of a plethora of “local economies” of interdependent and small communities that strive to give-and-take locally from each other as well as this planet.

– Ratheesh Pisharody

Writer, Bangalore, ratheesh.pisharody@gmail.com

Let’s Cross Over

#MonsterEconomy is dying, Let’s Cross Over…!

                                                                                                 – Prasanna

Let’s Cross Over

Monster Economy is dying. But we are unable to accept the fact. Like the children of a dying Grand-old-man, we have put the economy on ventilators; in an expensive hospital, called experts from all over the world, taken suggestions, even when those suggestions are contradictory to each other, and spent huge amounts of, scarce, national and international resource, on the treatment.

We are so completely involved with the dying monster that we don’t even want to go out of the emergency ward and see life as it is being lived. We do not want to notice for example, that even in the few weeks of the Corona Emergency the living world has already started looking livelier. The carbon emission levels have already started to come down and that the atmosphere has started showing signs of recovery. Nor for example do we, see animals (even wild ones) crossing over city streets, deserted and thus safe!

Instead, we want to go quickly back into the death ward, to pump more oxygen on to the dead lungs of the dying man! We are scared! Terribly, terribly, scared! The fact remains that we do not know how to manage without the monster! We do not know how to give up all the comforts that the old system offered! Unlimited travel, unlimited luxury, good looking malls, expensive hotels, connectivity and comfort!

But think! The wild animal crossing the street in a deserted city, whose picture we saw on the social media post, was crossing over and not intending to walk the street. We, on the contrary, have been walking the street, and want to continue to walk the street! We feel scared to crossover! We feel unsure on the natural ground; feel insecure with a hard working life! That’s our dilemma!

Look at it this way! The grand-old-man distributed his wealth unequally. His pet son (10% of the population) got a lion’s share, while the hard working children (90% of the population) had to scramble desperately for food even. The old man never cared for the old woman, meaning the nature! He is like the father in the Dostoevsky novel ‘Brothers Karamazov’. Of course, like in the novel, the monster economy has a few good qualities. For example, being driven by the machine, it looked after the business well. Let’s remember the good qualities, put a nice picture of it on the wall and cross over. In the novel one of the sons of the rascal father is called Alyosha Karamazov. He is a nice human being, almost a saint. We will have to follow his example, whether we like it or not!

Anyway there seems to be no choice. Why should we postpone the inevitable? If we pump more oxygen, the monster may breathe for a couple more years, but each such delay can put the living world to extinction. Let’s do Something.

  • Prasanna

Playwright, Theatre Director and Social Activist, Gram Seva Sangh

Commercial success at the cost of destroying a river – Tiruppur’s Garment Business Case Story

 

Noyyal River - Tirupur

A Business model that damages Ecology

Tiruppur’s cloth range are not environmentally sustainable.

 

South India’s Tiruppur City is an example of the environmental damages, non-sustainable cloth and garment manufacturing processes can cause to a City’s precious rivers and water resources. This is a case in point of how business and economic progress took place at a huge cost of causing severe environmental degradation.

Noyyal River sacrificed for having the textile industry flourish!!

Tiruppur is a famous centre for it’s cotton knitwear , particularly cotton t-shirts. During the 1990’s, Tiruppur’s economy in terms of employment and export earnings thrived due to the cotton knitwear industry. The City’s garment businesses have got many global fashion retailers as customers. However, the process of manufacturing these garments involved bleaching and chemical dyeing which polluted the Tiruppur City’s Noyyal river which was once beautiful.

Contamination and pollution of Noyyal River -Tiruppur

 

Farmers lose out with their lands getting degraded

Farmers occupation hit at Tiruppur - India

 

Subsequently over the years, the Noyyal river became a toxic sewer and with the river’s chemically contaminated waters creeping into the groundwater table , a major natural source of clean water was destroyed and the water became unfit to be used for most of the agricultural purposes. All farmers in and around the district that depended on the waters of the Noyyal river for irrigation were negatively impacted.

Noyyal River - Tiruppur,India

 

 Productive Farming prevalent before the entities began their contamination

Before the dyeing and bleaching era existed prior to the 1990’s the Noyyal river which was clean supported the farming community as farmers grew a variety of crops – rice, sugarcane, groundnut, sesame, turmeric, beetroot, green chilli, tomato, cotton, tobacco, banana etc. Now the dirty, toxic contaminated waters of Noyyal river have destroyed farming occupations as the only crops that can be grown using these now toxic waters are coconuts and maize predominately used in dairy and livestock farming.

Unhealthy yield of coconut - Tiruppur, India

 

Even the coconuts that are grown now are of deteriorated quality looking small and unhealthy.

Farmer earnings now hit rock bottom!!

Villages that are even 70km downstream from Tiruppur are negatively impacted due to contamination of the Noyyal river with farmers making paltry earnings, as their agricultural lands and occupations are ruined, all due to these harmful effluents released by Tiruppur’s dye and bleaching entities!!

Tiruppur’s residents lose a precious source of water

Weeds, Distroyed Noyyal River, Tiruppur, India

Besides the farmers, resident people too are negatively affected with their local water resource contaminated and wasted by Tiruppur’s environmentally destructive textile manufacturing practices.

Let’s remember the water footprint of making one cotton t-shirt

Every cotton t-shirt has a water footprint with 1000’s of litres of water required to make it, beginning from growing the cotton crop, then processing of the cloth and wastage of water due to pollution involved in this process as well. Each cloth wastes, a natural resource that these days is critically scant.

 It’s possible to apply natural dyes for clothes – Sustainable Alternative

Charaka naturally dyed handloom clothes

 

This need not have been the story if Tiruppur did manufacture garments in an environmentally friendly, ethical way. For instance, Charaka, a women’s co-operative located at Bhimanakone Village in the Western Ghats region of Southern India, manufactures handloom garments using natural dyes.

Natural Dyes extracted from plant varieties

These natural dyes are extracted from crops and plants available in the forests of Western Ghats; like arecanut, pomegranate, jackwood, madder root for rich colours and hues of brown, red and yellow.

 Handmade clothes made with care employing rural locals

Designs made on a naturally dyed handloom cloth using Block Printing technique

Charaka was successful in providing employment and livelihoods to women of the region. Such garments are manufactured with care for the environment and done using labour employing their hand skills in weaving naturally dyed garments using handlooms.

Fabrics are woven using handloom employing labour

Fabrics are woven using handloom employing labour

 

Additional value is added to the garments with designs made on them with elegant hand embroidery and block printing, where wood blocks are used to make designs on the garments.

Charaka's elegant hand embroidery on their naturally dyed handloom clothes

Ultimate in Sustainability

Such a business model is sustainable, it employs local resources from raw materials to labour, gives jobs to rural people and there is a special value because these products are handmade, eco-friendly.

 We can make sustainable choices in making purchases!!

A takeaway for us in all this, is that when we buy clothes, we choose clothes that are ethically made, clothes that are made without polluting rivers without destroying livelihoods of farmers. This is sustainable fashion.

Charaka range of eco sustainable dresses for men

 

There is more value for a cloth that’s made with care, using hand skills of local rural people, than mass produced soulless machine made mass produced clothes.

Charaka range of eco sustainable dresses for women.

India we all know used to be popular with Khadi cloth business as well, it supported the village economy providing jobs to people of rural India. We have the choice of making conscious sustainable choices, valuing environment, labour and creating a positive change by buying clothes that helps in giving a living to local people, providing them respect and dignity for their valuable work.

All photos related to the Noyyal River taken from the following wire article
https://thewire.in/environment/australian-open-tiruppur-dyeing-bleaching-groundwater-contamination-agriculture-noyyal-river
Photo credits to Neetha Deshpande

 

ಸಹಿಷ್ಣುತೆಗಾಗಿ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯ ಸಮ್ಮೇಳನ

ದಕ್ಷಿಣಾಯಣ ಮತ್ತು ಗ್ರಾಮ ಸೇವಾ ಸಂಘ

2 ಸೆಪ್ಟೆಂಬರ್ 2018, ಭಾನುವಾರ ಬೆಳಿಗ್ಗೆ 10 ರಿಂದ ಸಂಜೆ 6 ವರೆಗೆ

ಸೆನೇಟ್ ಭವನ, ಸೆಂಟ್ರಲ್ ಕಾಲೇಜು ಆವರಣ, ಬೆಂಗಳೂರು

ಗೆಳೆಯರೇ,

ಭಾರತೀಯ ಸಮಾಜವು ಛಿದ್ರವಾಗುತ್ತಿದೆ. ಚರಿತ್ರೆಯಲ್ಲಿ ಅಪರೂಪಕ್ಕೆ ನೋಡಿದಂಥ ಅಪಾಯವು ನಮ್ಮೆದುರಿಗಿದೆ. ಮನುಷ್ಯಪರ ಧರ್ಮಗಳು, ಜೀವನ ಕ್ರಮಗಳು, ಸಹಬಾಳ್ವೆಯ ರೀತಿಗಳು ನಾಶವಾಗುತ್ತಿವೆ. ಯಂತ್ರ ನಾಗರೀಕತೆ, ಆರ್ಥಿಕ ಏರುಪೇರುಗಳು, ಗ್ರಾಮನಾಶ, ಕಸುಬುನಾಶ ಅವ್ಯಾಹತವಾಗಿ ನಡೆದಿವೆ. ಬಿಕ್ಕಟ್ಟುಗಳ ನಿಜ ಸ್ವರೂಪ ಬೇರೆಯೇ ಆದರೂ ಅವುಗಳನ್ನು ಧಾರ್ಮಿಕ ಸಂಗತಿಗಳನ್ನಾಗಿ ಪರಿವರ್ತಿಸಲಾಗುತ್ತದೆ. ಧರ್ಮಗಳ ಮಾನವೀಯ ಅಂಶಗಳನ್ನು ಬದಿಗೊತ್ತಿರುವ ಈ ಆಕ್ರಾಮಕ ವಿಕೃತಿಯನ್ನು ಧಾರ್ಮಿಕತೆಯೆಂದು ಪ್ರಚಾರ ಮಾಡಲಾಗುತ್ತಿದೆ. ಪರಿಣಾಮವಾಗಿ ಅಸಹಿಷ್ಣುತೆ, ದ್ವೇಷ ಪ್ರತಿಪಾದನೆಯಾಗುತ್ತಿವೆ. ಸಂವಿಧಾನವನ್ನು ಬುಡಮೇಲು ಮಾಡಲಾಗುತ್ತಿದೆ.

ಬಿಕ್ಕಟ್ಟಿನ ಸಂದರ್ಭದಲ್ಲಿಯೇ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯವು ತನ್ನ ಅಂತಃಶಕ್ತಿಯನ್ನು ಕಂಡುಕೊಳ್ಳುತ್ತದೆ ಹಾಗೂ ಸಮುದಾಯಗಳ ಒಡನೆ ಸಂಭಾಷಣೆಯನ್ನು ಆರಂಭಿಸುತ್ತದೆ. ಈಗ ನಮ್ಮೆದುರಿಗೆ ಇರುವ ಜವಾಬ್ದಾರಿಯೆಂದರೆ ನಮ್ಮ ನಮ್ಮ ಸಮುದಾಯಗಳೊಂದಿಗೆ ಮಾತುಕತೆಗೆ ತೊಡಗಬೇಕಾದ ಅಗತ್ಯವಿದೆ. ನಾವೆಲ್ಲ ಸೇರಿ ಹೊಸ ದಾರಿಗಳನ್ನು ಹುಡುಕಬೇಕಾಗಿದೆ. ಈ ಹಿನ್ನೆಲೆಯಲ್ಲಿ 2 ಸೆಪ್ಟೆಂಬರ್ 2018ರ ಭಾನುವಾರದಂದು ಭಾರತೀಯ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯ ಸಮ್ಮೇಳವನ್ನು ಬೆಂಗಳೂರಿನ ಸೆಂಟ್ರಲ್ ಕಾಲೇಜಿನ ಸೆನೇಟ್ ಭವನದಲ್ಲಿ (ಅದು ಈಗ ಬೆಂಗಳೂರು ಕೇಂದ್ರೀಯ ವಿಶ್ವವಿದ್ಯಾಲಯದ ಭಾಗವಾಗಿದೆ) ಏರ್ಪಡಿಸಲು ದಕ್ಷಿಣಾಯಣ ಹಾಗೂ ಗ್ರಾಮ ಸೇವಾ ಸಂಘಗಳು ಜೊತೆಗೂಡುತ್ತಿವೆ. ಈ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯ ಸಮ್ಮೇಳನದಲ್ಲಿ ಕನ್ನಡ ಬರಹಗಾರರ ಜೊತೆಗೆ ಅನೇಕ ರಾಜ್ಯಗಳ ವಿವಿಧ ಭಾಷೆಯ ಬರಹಗಾರರು ಕೂಡ ದನಿಗೂಡಿಸಲಿದ್ದಾರೆ. ಎಲ್ಲ ಬಗೆಯ ಧಾರ್ಮಿಕ ಉಗ್ರವಾದವನ್ನು ಶಮನಗೊಳಿಸುವುದು ಮತ್ತು ಗ್ರಾಮಗಳನ್ನು ಕಟ್ಟುವುದು, ಇವೇ ಈ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯ ಸಮ್ಮೇಳನದ ಎರಡು ಪ್ರಧಾನ ಆಶಯಗಳಾಗಿವೆ. ಎಲ್ಲ ಮನುಷ್ಯರೊಳಗೆ ತುಡಿಯುವ ಅಂತಃಕರಣವನ್ನು ಸಂಭ್ರಮಿಸುವುದೂ ಕೂಡ ಸಮ್ಮೇಳನದ ಉದ್ದೇಶವಾಗಿದೆ. ಈ ಸಮ್ಮೇಳನವು ಕನ್ನಡ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯಕ್ಕೆ ಹಾಗೂ ಭಾರತೀಯ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯಕ್ಕೆ ಒಂದು ಹೊಸ ತಿರುವನ್ನು ಕೊಡಲಿದೆಯೆಂದು ನಿರೀಕ್ಷಿಸುತ್ತಿದ್ದೇವೆ.

ನಾವು ಲೇಖಕರು, ಕಲಾವಿದರು, ಸಹಿಷ್ಣುತೆಯ ಸಾಮಾಜಿಕ ಜವಾಬ್ದಾರಿಯನ್ನು ಹೊರಲಿಕ್ಕೆ ಸಿದ್ಧರಾಗಿದ್ದೇವೆ. ನಾವು ಪ್ರತಿಯೊಬ್ಬರೂ ನಮ್ಮ ನಮ್ಮ ಹಿತ್ತಲಿಗೆ ಹೋಗಿ ನಮ್ಮ ಸಮುದಾಯದೊಂದಿಗೆ ಮಾತನಾಡುತ್ತೇವೆ.

ದಕ್ಷಿಣಾಯಣ

ದಕ್ಷಿಣಾಯಣವು ಪ್ರಸಿದ್ದ ವಿಮರ್ಶಕ ಹಾಗೂ ಭಾಷಾತಜ್ಞರಾದ ಪ್ರೊ. ಗಣೇಶ್ ದೇವಿಯವರ ಮಾರ್ಗದರ್ಶನದಲ್ಲಿ ಜೊತೆಗೂಡಿದ ಭಾರತೀಯ ಬರಹಗಾರರ, ಕಲಾವಿದರ, ಚಲನಚಿತ್ರ ನಿರ್ದೇಶಕರ ಚಳುವಳಿಯಾಗಿದೆ. ಇದು ಪ್ರಜಾಪ್ರಭುತ್ವವಾದಿ, ಅಭಿವ್ಯಕ್ತಿ ಸ್ವಾತಂತ್ರ್ಯ ಪರವಾದ ಎಲ್ಲಾ ಭಾಷೆಗಳ ಬರಹಗಾರರು, ಕಲಾವಿದರಿಗೆ ಒಂದು ವೇದಿಕೆಯಾಗಿದೆ. ಭಾರತದ ಅನೇಕ ರಾಜ್ಯಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ದಕ್ಷಿಣಾಯಣವು ಅತ್ಯಂತ ಕ್ರಿಯಾಶೀಲವಾಗಿದೆ ಇದರ ಕರ್ನಾಟಕದ ಶಾಖೆಯು ಕಳೆದ ವರ್ಷ ಶಿವಮೊಗ್ಗದಲ್ಲಿ ಚಾರಿತ್ರಿಕವಾದ ಸಮ್ಮೇಳನವನ್ನು ನಡೆಸಿತ್ತು. ಅಲ್ಲದೆ ಹತ್ಯೆಗಳಿಗೆ ಬಲಿಯಾದ ಪ್ರೊ.ಎಂ.ಎಂ. ಕಲುಬುರ್ಗಿ ಮತ್ತು ಗೌರಿ ಲಂಕೇಶರ ಪರವಾದ ಚಳುವಳಿಗಳಲ್ಲಿ ಸಕ್ರಿಯವಾಗಿ ಭಾಗವಹಿಸಿದೆ.

ಗ್ರಾಮ ಸೇವಾ ಸಂಘ

ಗ್ರಾಮ ಸೇವಾ ಸಂಘವು ಚಿಂತಕರು, ಸಾಂಸ್ಕೃತಿಕ ಚಳುವಳಿಗಳನ್ನು ಹುಟ್ಟುಹಾಕಿದ ಶ್ರೀ ಪ್ರಸನ್ನ ಅವರ ಮಾರ್ಗದರ್ಶನದಲ್ಲಿ ಕ್ರಿಯಾಶೀಲವಾಗಿರುವ ಸಂಘಟನೆಯಾಗಿದೆ. ಗ್ರಾಮಸ್ವರಾಜ್ಯ ಮತ್ತು ಕೈಉತ್ಪನ್ನಗಳನ್ನು ತಯಾರಿಸುವ ಶ್ರಮಜೀವಿಗಳ ಪರವಾಗಿ ಜನಾಂದೋಲನವನ್ನು ನಡೆಸುತ್ತಲಿದೆ. ಯಂತ್ರನಾಗರಿಕತೆ ಹಾಗೂ ಅದರ ಫಲವಾಗಿ ಹುಟ್ಟುಕೊಂಡಿರುವ ಎಲ್ಲ ಬಗೆಯ ಉಗ್ರವಾದವನ್ನು ಅದು ವಿರೋಧಿಸುತ್ತದೆ.

ಬೆಂಗಳೂರಿನಲ್ಲಿ ನೂತನವಾಗಿ ಸ್ಥಾಪಿತವಾದ ಬೆಂಗಳೂರು ಕೇಂದ್ರೀಯ ವಿಶ್ವವಿದ್ಯಾಲಯವು ತನ್ನ ಸಹಯೋಗವನ್ನು ಈ ಕಾರ್ಯಕ್ರಮಕ್ಕೆ ನೀಡುತ್ತಿದೆ.

ಗಣೇಶ್ ದೇವಿ, ರಹಮತ್ ತರೀಕೆರೆ, ಜಿ. ಎನ್ ನಾಗರಾಜ್, ಪ್ರಸನ್ನ, ರಾಜೇಂದ್ರ ಚೆನ್ನಿ, ಹಾಗೂ ಇತರ ಹೆಸರಾಂತ ಸಾಹಿತಿಗಳು ಭಾರತದಾದ್ಯಂತದಿಂದ ಸಮ್ಮೇಳನದಲ್ಲಿ ಪಾಲ್ಗೊಳ್ಳುತ್ತಿದ್ದಾರೆ.

ಸಹಿಷ್ಣುತೆಗಾಗಿ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯ ಸಮ್ಮೇಳನದಲ್ಲಿ ನೀವು ನಮ್ಮ ಜೊತೆಗೆ ಬನ್ನಿ ಎಂದು ವೈಯಕ್ತಿಕವಾಗಿ ತಮ್ಮನ್ನು ಪ್ರಿತಿಯಿಂದ ಆಹ್ವಾನಿಸುತ್ತಿದ್ದೇವೆ.

ಇಂತಿ

ರಾಜೇಂದ್ರ ಚೆನ್ನಿ                                                                                             ಪ್ರಸನ್ನ

 ದಕ್ಷಿಣಾಯಣ                                                                                      ಗ್ರಾಮ ಸೇವಾ ಸಂಘ

ಸ್ವಾಗತ ಸಮಿತಿ

ಅಧ್ಯಕ್ಷರು: ಪ್ರೊ. ಎಸ್. ಜಾಫೆಟ್, ಕುಲಪತಿಗಳು, ಬೆಂಗಳೂರು ಕೇಂದ್ರೀಯ ವಿಶ್ವವಿದ್ಯಾಲಯ

ಸದಸ್ಯರು: ಡಿ. ಕೆ. ಚೌಟ, ಡಾ. ವಿಜಯಮ್ಮ, ಎಂ. ಎಸ್, ಸತ್ಯು, ಡಾ. ಅಜಯ್ ಕುಮಾರ್ ಸಿಂಗ್, ಎಂ. ಡಿ. ಒಕ್ಕುಂದ

ಕೆ. ವಿ. ನಾಗರಾಜ್ ರ್ಮೂತಿ, ಶಶಿಧರ್ ಅಡಪ, ಡಾ. ಷಾಕಿರಾ ಖಾನಂ, ಪ್ರೊ., ಜಿ. ಬಿ.ಶಿವರಾಜ್, ಎಂ. ಸಿ. ನರೇಂದ್ರ

ಸಹಿಷ್ಣುತೆಗಾಗಿ ಸಾಹಿತ್ಯ ಸಮ್ಮೇಳನ

2 ಸೆಪ್ಟೆಂಬರ್ 2018, ಭಾನುವಾರ ಬೆಳಿಗ್ಗೆ 10 ರಿಂದ ಸಂಜೆ 6 ವರೆಗೆ

ಸೆನೇಟ್ ಭವನ, ಸೆಂಟ್ರಲ್ ಕಾಲೇಜು ಆವರಣ, ಬೆಂಗಳೂರು

ದಕ್ಷಿಣಾಯಣ ಮತ್ತು ಗ್ರಾಮ ಸೇವಾ ಸಂಘ

www.GramSevaSangh.org | gramsevasanghindia@gmail.com | Mobile : 9980043911

Twitter : gramasevasangha | FaceBook: GramSevaSanghIndia

 

PROTEST Against Neglect of Handmade

Townhall, Bengaluru | 6th May-18 Sun 4:30 pm to 6:30 pm

This PROTEST is Continuation of #TaxDenialSatyagraha, where we demanded to zero the GST on all #TheHandmade Products.  They have not fulfilled their promise yet!!!  Come and support for the Handmaking People.
Join this Protest with eminent artists, writers, artisans, citizens ..,

Gram Seva Sangh supports the struggles for sustenance of hand-making people across India, who constitute a majority of its poor, disadvantaged and marginalized. Over the last year, Gram Seva Sangh has been spearheading a movement to enable sustainable livelihoods through better value for handmade products. As part of the movement, the Sangh has organized a wide-ranging Satyagraha across large parts of Karnataka, comprising peaceful protests, padayatras as well as a hunger strike, demanding zero-GST for handmade products.

Why this Protest?

Post independence, our political establishment has completely neglected the betterment of the lives and livelihoods of a majority in the country. As a result, a large number of our toiling countrymen are facing conditions of distress even while their livelihoods are simultaneously becoming untenable.

Widespread mechanization has imposed further difficulties on large sections of the people. It threatens the very survival of the common man while also resulting in a severe erosion of his dignity. It is only in recent years that we are becoming conscious of the consequences of mechanization. A fundamental outcome is the collapse of the markets for handmade products that in turn has destroyed the livelihoods of millions, while providing outsized benefits to a small number of people in the society. This is clearly seen in the rural and urban areas, in the lives of both the ordinary and the super-rich, in India as well across the world.

It is shocking to witness all political parties presenting themselves every five years in the best light through impeccable manifestos (and glowing reports of excellent plans and extraordinary achievements) on behalf of the poor and the marginalized, the villagers, the urbanites, and others in the country. It is equally tragic to witness the ordinary man, who should know better through experience, repeatedly falling for the false promises of the political classes of all parties.

In this context, Gram Seva Sangh has resolved to demand that all political parties deliver on their promises; and wake up to their responsibilities towards the common man. The demand will be placed through a massive protest planned to be held on Sunday, 6th May 2018, at the Town Hall, Bengaluru, between 4:30 and 6:30 PM.

We invite you to attend this important event which is planned as a first in a series intended to enforce responsibility and sincerity on people’s representatives in fulfilling their promises. We urge you to help empower the people of the country through your vigorous participation in this event.

Please note that this protest is NOT against any specific party or government.

Our only demand is that all parties deliver on promises. Immediately.

GRAM SEVA SANGH | Address: Flat # 102, Sheshanivas, 47, 1st Block, 1st Main, Thyagarajanagar, Bengaluru—560 028
Mobile: +91 99800 43911 | Emailgramsevasanghindia@gmail.com
|Websitewww.gramsevasangh.org
Facebook@gramsevasanghindia | Twitter@gramasevasangha

Development to Displacements on the right-bank of Tungabhadra

Day 13
11 February, 2018
Hampapattana

The stretch from Mariammanhalli to Varadapura, our first pit-stop seemed like a land of transition,  along with the landscape even people’s accent and food habits changed. For the first time in our journey from the North, we come across people who eat ragi, but not as much as those who live further south. Most people we spoke to, said they also eat other millets like Navane (Foxtail millet) and Same (Little millet).

Continue reading Development to Displacements on the right-bank of Tungabhadra

Art of Re-cyclying

 

Art of Re-cyclying

Activist-friends took us to Mochi Hunagund Yallappa’s (of the Muchigeri community) house. Saraswatamma and Manjula, his neighbours who make kavadi/quilts were also there. Traditionally, Muchigeri or Mochi community were involved in sewing kavadi, which is not only handmade but also a recycled product made from old saris and other used cloth.

Continue reading Art of Re-cyclying

Marching through the Hand-sculpted Historic landscape

Day 8
06th February, 2018
Kanakagiri

We moved from the Nawabs ruled Hyderabad-Karnataka region to the Vijayanagar empire as we moved towards Kanakagiri. We could see the change in the landscape, crops and architecture of temples with Sufi influence still existing but not as prominent as in Hyderabad-Karnataka.

Continue reading Marching through the Hand-sculpted Historic landscape

Towards Tungabhadra…

Day 9
7 February, 2018
Gangawathi

Just after we set from Kanakagiri early in the morning, we met two Kurubas Jamanna and Lingappa carrying their drums as they were waiting for a bus to their village. They perform drums in village festivals but their regular work is Shepherding, most communities earlier had one or other performing art skills.

Continue reading Towards Tungabhadra…